We have updated our Privacy Policy Please take a moment to review it. By continuing to use this site, you agree to the terms of our updated Privacy Policy.

Hot Stew reads like a great night out in a city that never sleeps’ Jan Carson

‘Fiona Mozley not only fulfills her promise but surpasses it. Her new stew is such a steaming, fuming mix of life, lust and London that in the end you feel like you’ve eaten all of Soho’ Hallgrímur Helgason

‘Did you know in Tudor times all the brothels were south of the river in Southwark and it was only much later that they moved up this way to Soho. Stews, they were called then.’

Pungent, steamy, insatiable Soho; the only part of London that truly never sleeps. Tourists dawdling, chancers skulking, addicts shuffling, sex workers strutting, punters prowling, businessmen striding, the homeless and the lost. Down Wardour Street, ducking onto Dean Street, sweeping into L’Escargot, darting down quiet back alleyways, skirting dumpsters and drunks, emerging on to raucous main roads, fizzing with energy and riotous with life.

On a corner, sits a large townhouse, the same as all its neighbours. But this building hosts a teeming throng of rich and poor, full from the basement right up to the roof terrace. Precious and Tabitha call the top floors their home but it’s under threat; its billionaire-owner Agatha wants to kick the women out to build expensive restaurants and luxury flats. Men like Robert, who visit the brothel, will have to go elsewhere. Those like Cheryl, who sleep in the basement, will have to find somewhere else to hide after dark. But the women won’t go quietly. Soho is their turf and they are ready for a fight.

Reviews

Mozley has an incredible gift for writing place . . . Hot Stew reads like a great night out in a city that never sleeps. Her characters have a Dickensian swagger. They are backstreet heroes and villains, trying not to be eaten alive by the city they both love and hate
Jan Carson
Fiona Mozley not only fulfills her promise but surpasses it. Her new stew is such a steaming, fuming mix of life, lust and London that in the end you feel like you've eaten all of Soho
Hallgrímur Helgason, author of The Woman at 1000 Degrees
Fiona Mozley's Elmet was a breakout title in 2017 and her follow-up Hot Stew should make even more waves . . . Deftly exploring a very real clash of cultures, this is a funny and smart book
Stylist
A rollicking tale of pimps and prostitutes, property and posterity
Alex Preston, Observer
The talented Mozley takes on gentrification, Soho and property in a rambunctious, rewarding read
i
Mozley's Soho is a village populated by a cast of characters as vivid and memorable as any imagined by Dickens. In gorgeously beguiling prose, their pasts and presents are deftly woven into a story that tells uncomfortable truths about power and money and the state of our cities. I loved this book
Louise Kennedy